Inokuma Isao, Sato, Nobuyuki, " Best Judo ",

Tokyo, Japan, Kodansha International, 1979, 255p, 26 cm, 3539, ISBN 0870117866.

Techniques of Judo


1 Nage-waza (投げ技): throwing techniques

 

Techniques in which the opponent (UKE) is thrown. KODOKAN JUDO includes 67 official throwing techniques, including 15 hand (TE), 11 hip (KOSHI), 21 foot (ASHI), 5 supine sacrifice (MA SUTEMI), and 15 side sacrifice (YOKO SUTEMI) techniques. Plus counter-techniques (KAESHI WAZA). A modern Non-Japanese JUDOKA need know only 15 throws to begin with.

 

For READING

Daigo Toshiro: Francoise White, “Kodokan Judo: Throwing techniques”, Kodansha Europe,   2005, 285p, ISBN 0875231438

Kudo Kazuzo, “Judo in action: throwing techniques”, Tokyo, Japan, Japan Publication Trading, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1974, 1976, 1978, 1989, 127p ISBN 0870400746.

Okano Isao: Sato Tetsuya, “Vital judo: Throwing techniques”, Tokyo, Japan, Japan Publication, 1973, 191p, ISBN 0870401734.

 

Te-waza (手技): hand throwing techniques

Classification for throwing techniques in which the use of the hands plays a central rule.Techniques of

 

   Ippon seoinage (本背負い投げ, or 本背負投): One arm shoulder throw

A hand technique throw.It is of the one arm (IPPON) type, which displays the powerful effect made possible by unbalancing and livering UKE’s body high up and over the back and shoulder region of the TORI.It is a variation of SEOINAGE. Your left hand holds your opponent’s right inner sleeve. As you pivot, slip your right arm through his right armpit and grab the top of his sleeve or his right shoulder. And the execution of the technique is the same of SEOI-NAGE. Lot of championships have been won with the IPPON SEOINAGE. The list of famous users are Doug Nelson, United States Grand Champion and Olympian,  Isao INOKUMA, twice All Japan Champion, World Champion  and Olympic Gold Medalist Isao OKANO, the twice World Champion  Sumio ENDO and, of course, the famous Masahiko KIMURA, the undefeated champion of Japan. In the GOKYO, IPPONSEOINAGE is grouped together with MOROTESEOINAGE under the heading SEOINAGE.

  • Combination Technique: IPPON-SEOI-NAGE

                                                   KOUCHI-GARI

                                                   SEOI-OTOSHI

                                                   OSOTO-GARI

 

 

  • Counter Technique:          OKURI-ERI-JIME

                                                     SUKUI-NAGE

 

   Kata guruma (肩車): Shoulder wheel

A hand technique throw.3rd technique of NAGE NO KATA. The concept of this technique is to drop low, pulling the opponent across the back of your shoulder, and then to throw by standing up and pulling him/her over your shoulder. This is a very grand throw as it drops the opponent from the standing height of your shoulders.KATA-GURUMA has won enormous popularity again in the last few years. Together with the spread and increasing acceptance of this technique, KATA-GURUMA has captured a leading place aongst the most successful throws in men’s JUDO. In all male WEIGHT CATEGORIEes, and in an increasing number of women’s categories, you can find JUDOKAs at the top level who successfully perform these throws.

Combination Techniques:            KOUCHI GARI

         OUCHI GARI

                                                                     OSOTO GARI

NEW RULES

 

Effective from 1st November 2010

 

·         Kata guruma is now only allowed if the thrower stays on their feet for the duration of the throw.

 

 

 

·         If the throw is attempted as a dropping technique, or tori’s knee touches the ground during the technique, or if it is performed as a sacrifice technique, then it will attract a shido penalty.

 

 

The IJF has through its leg grab rules effectively banned kata guruma. The BJC was minded to do the same, but in the end kept the technique as long as it was performed from a standing position and ended in a standing position. So, there is no dropping onto the knees to perform the technique or performing it as a sacrifice.

 

   Kibisu gaeshi (踵返): One-hand reversal

This  technique is very simple and relies on surprise.To make the throw TORI releases his/her right grip, drops down suddenly, catches hold round UKE’s ankle and  pulls it forward. To reinforce the action the other hand holding the sleeve pulls down strongly at the same time.

 

   Morote gari (双手刈): Two-hand reap

A hand technique throw. TORI throws UKE down by taking hold of both of his/her legs together, when UKE is in standing form. Robert Van Der Walle Olympic (Moscow, 1980) and European Champion (1985, 1986) was principally known for his MOROTE-GARI, his two-leg pick up which he did on most opponents from the beginning to the end  of his career.

 It has been officially recognized by the Kodokan as a judo throw since 1982 and had been used in competition for years, but under current IJF competition rules (as of 2014) this technique is no longer permitted.

For Readingvan de Walle, Robert (1993), "Pick-ups", Judo Masterclass Techniques (second ed.) (Ippon Books), ISBN 1-874572-10-0

 

   Obi otoshi (帯落): Belt drop

A hand technique throw. TORI catches hold of UKE’s belt at the front with his/her left hand and pulls it forward and up. UKE’s upper body is  being driven back and down. This throw is somewhat similar to SUKUI-NAGE and WAKI-OTOSHI with which it is often confused.

 

   Seoi nage (背負い投げ, or 背負投): Lifting shoulder throw or back carry throw

A hand technique throw. There are two distinct types of Shoulder Throw in use, MOROTE SEOINAGE (shoulder throw using both hands grip) and IPPON SEOINAGE (shoulder throw using a one hand grip). It is an arm throw, not a hip throw. A powerful impetus stems from the hands, TORI’s hips, although turned in deep, do not necessarily touch UKE. Children love these throws.

  • Combination Technique:       SEOI-OTOSHI

                                                             OUCHI-GARI

 

  • Counter Technique:               USHIRO-GOSHI

STATISTICS: SEOI-NAGE is the most successful technique in all 797 fights (102/63)             /62%/ of the WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP, 1999 (Men).

 

For Reading

·         NakanishiHidetoshi, “Seoi-nage (judo masterclass techniques),”London, United Kingdom, Ippon Books, 1992, 160p, ISBN 0951845543.

·         Sweeney, A.J.: Goodger, B.C.: Harreaves, P.H., “Famous Judo throws: 3 seoinage”, London, United Kingdom, Leonard Hill Books, 1969, 96p, MBR.

 

  

 

Seoi otoshi (背負落): Kneeling shoulder drop

A hand technique throw. Break your UKE’s balance to his front or right front corner, load him onto your back, then drop one or both knees to the mat to throw him over your shoulder and down. An applied from of SEOI-NAGE. Angelo Parisi (1953- ) Olympic and three times European Champion won his third European title (1983) with his TOKUI-WAZA, SEOI-OTOSHI.

 

Combination Techniques:     EASHI BARAI

                                                      UCHI GARI

 

Counter Techniques:            OSOTO GAKE

 

 

 

   Sukui nage (掬投): Scoop throw

A hand technique throw From your opponent’s side, use both hands to wrap around his thighs from the front (or thrust one hand between his legs to wrap around his buttocks) to break his balance directly to his rear then scoop him/her up and throw him/her backwards.

SUKUI-NAGE is mostly done as a counter throw to HARAI-GOSHI, O-GURUMA, UCHI-MATA and OUCHI-GARI and indeed any throw where UKE attacks with one leg forward.

This throw is also known as TE-GURUMA, KIN-TSUKAMI, UDE-GURUMA.

 

STATISTICS: SUKUI-NAGE/TE-GURUMA is the most successful technique in all 797   fights (60/35) /58%/ of the 1999 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP (Men).

 

Favourite Technique of Ingrid Berghmans, Olympic and World Champion                       (three times) Sumio Endo, twice World Champion

 

   Sumi otoshi (隅落): Corner drop

A hand technique throw. This throw  is very similar to UKIOTOSHI, but this time UKE’s balance is broken towards his/her right-rear corner. It is the most difficult of the hand throws and as a result is rarely seen  in competition. Many a contest against a difficult opponent has been won with a surprise technique such as this. Step to the outside of your opponent’s right foot and use the shifting movement of your body and the action of both of your hands to break his balance to his right rear corner and throw his down in that direction. This throw is also known as KUKI-NAGE (Air throw).

 

   Tai otoshi (體落): Body drop

A hand technique throw. This throw is probably  the best for a beginner to start on . There are  a number of variations, but in all of them the basic action is the same.In this technique TORI unbalance the UKE to his/her right front corner by lifting him/her up on his/her toes as he/she moves forward UKE can also be thrown sideways and when he/she moves backward, but this is move difficult. The UKE is thrown in a large circular motion across TORI’s right leg.

 

Favourite technique of Wilhelm Ruska, Olympic and twice World Champion

Neil Adams (1958- ) Olympic Silver Medallist (Moscow 1980, LosAngeles 1984)

World Champion (1981) European Champion (1979, -80,-83,-84,-85)

Michael Swain (1960 -) Olympic Bronze Medallist (1988 Seoul)World Championship Gold Medallist (1987) Silver Medallist (1985,-89)

Isao INOKUMA (1938-2001) Olympic Champion (1964 Tokyo) World Champion ( 1965, Open Cat.) All-Japan Champion (1959)

  • Combination Technique:       KOUCHI-GARI

                                                              OUCHI-GARI

                                                              TAI-OTOSHI

 

  • Counter Technique:               KOSOTO-GAKE

 

 

STATISTICS: TAI-OTOSHI is the most successful technique in all 797 fights (48/27) /56%/ of the 1999 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP (Men). For women (311 fights) 19/9 (47%).

 

For READING

·         Legett, Trevor: Watanabe Kisaburo, Championship Judo: tai otoshi and o-uchi-gari attacks”, London, United Kingdom, Ippon, 1994, 64p ISBN 0874572550

·         Lubbert, Hal, „Insights on judo: The tactics of Tai Otoshi”, Cedar Falls, Iowa, USA, Kodokan Iowa Pub, 1985, LoC.

 

  Uchi mata sukashi (内股透): Inner thigh void throw

A hand technique throw. As your UKE moves in for a right UCHIMATA, slip past his/her reaping leg and use his/her momentum to throw him forward. Katsuhiko Kashiwazaki (1951- ) Japanese fighter twice World Champion won his second world title (1981, Maastricht) with a remarkable UCHIMATA SUKASHI

 

   Uki otoshi (浮落): Floating drop

A hand technique throw.1st technique of NAGE NO KATA.You break UKE’s balance to his/her right front corner and pull him downward with both hands causing him to fall forward in a circle. Pull hard using the combined power of both arms. This from of the throw is done in the throwing KATA (NAGE-NO-KATA and is often the more effective of the two.This technique remains unchanged from the form finally adopted by Jigoro KANO. Early form came from JU JUTSU.

 

   Yama arashi (山嵐): Mountain storm

A foot technique throw. This throw the mountain storm, is classified as a hand technique. Using both hands to grip your UKE’s right lapel and right sleeve, draw him/her forward to float his/her balance toward his/her right front corner, then use the back of your right leg to sweep his/her legs in an uplifting motion This throw was the favourite technique of SAIGO SHIRO who was fictionalized as Sugata Sanshiro in the famous JUDO novel JUDO Ichidai.

 

   Kouchi gaeshi (小内返): Small inner reap reversal

A hand technique throw. When UKE  attacks with a KOUCHI GARI to your right leg, slip your right leg free to avoid the reap, then instantly twist your body to the left to throw him/her.

 

Unrecognized technique

 

   Te Guruma (手車)

Original name of SUKUI-NAGE

 

 

   Koshi-waza (腰技): hip throwing techniques

Classification for throwing techniques in which the use of the waist and hips plays a central role.

 

   Daki age (抱上): Hugging high lift. (Forbidden in competition.)

A throwing technique, classified as a hip technique.  High lift, a technique in which the opponent is raised from the mat. This technique is not permitted in RANDORI or tournaments.

 

   Hane goshi (跳腰): Spring hip throw

It is a technique of KOSHI WAZA (hip throws). The entry for HANEGOSHI is the same as for HARAIGOSHI, but the working leg should not straighten for a sweep but rather bends at the knee,  TORI’s upper leg or thigh creating a kind of  platform across UKE.  You press your bent leg against UKE’s legs and leaning forward lift him/her up with your right leg and hip and at the same time turn your upper body to the left. Then he will be thrown.

 

Combination Techniques:      KOUCHI GARI

       OUCHI GARI

 

Counter Techniques:              USHIRO GOSHI

      UTSURI GOSHI

      TANI OTOSHI

     YOKO GURUMA

 

 

   Harai goshi (払腰): Sweeping hip throw

A hip technique throw.  Legend has it that it was originally devised by Dr. KANO. But the fact is this technique came from JUJUTSU and SUMO to JUDO. It is used by many big men. Among the users of it have been Akio KAMINAGA, twice ALL JAPAN CHAMPION, and Wilhelm RUSKA of Holland, twice WORLD CHAMPION.

TORI’s hip makes close contact with UKE’s abdomen and TORI sweeps UKE off balance with the back of his right thigh. ‘I like the particular style of HARAIGOSHI that I do because of the control one can maintain on the opponent’s upper body once the technique is in motion. This way it has to score IPPON.’ Alan Petherbridge, Member of British European Championship Team (1957), individual European Champion 1961.

  • Combination Technique:       OSOTO-GARI

                                                              UCHI-MATA

                                                              SOTO-MAKIKOMI

 

  • Counter Technique:                URA-NAGE

                                                              USHIRO-GOSHI

                                                              UTSURI-GOSHI

Favourite technique of  Wilhelm RUSKA Twice Olympic Medallist (Munich, 1972) World Champion (1967, 1971)

 

For READING

·         Hargreaves, P.H.: Ross, R.F..: Goodger, J.M., Famous Judo throws: 1 Haraigoshi”, London, United Kingdom, Leonard Hill Books, 1969, 111p, ISBN 0249439646

·         Rouge, Jean Luc, “Harai-goshi (judo masterclass techniques)”, London, United Kingdom, Ippon Books, 1991, 95p, ISBN 1852235977.

  

 

   Koshi guruma (腰車): Hip wheel

TORI pivots round with standard footwork, wraps his/her arm round UKE’s neck and pushes his/her hips completely through in front so that he has almost turned 270. From this position UKE is rolled (wheeled) over the lower back and hips.

Combination Techniques:      HARAI GOSHI

                                                                   OSOTO GARI

                                                                   TRURI KOMI GOSHI

                                                                   MAKIKOMI-WAZA

Counter Techniques:              USHIRO GOSHI

                                                                   UTSURI GOSHI

                                                                   TANI OTOSHI

 

Favorite Technique of Toshihiko Koga (1967-) Olympic Gold Medallist (Barcelona 1992) World Champion (1989, 1991, 1995)

 

   O goshi (大腰): Full hip throw

O-goshi is known to have existed in the Tenjin Shinyō-ryū traditional school (koryū) of jujutsu, which Jigoro Kano studied prior to founding judo. In Tenjin Shinyō-ryū texts, the throw is called koshi-nage (腰投, hip throw)

A hip technique throw. To execute O-GOSHI, you break UKE’s balance directly forward or to his/her right front corner, load him/her onto your right hip, then raise your hip and twist to throw him/her.

   This throw differs from UKI-GOSHI in that you insert your hip low and raise it as you throw.

  • Combination Technique: KOUCHI-GARI

                                                        OUCHI-GARI

                                                        HARAI-GOSHI

 

  • Counter Technique:         YOKO-GURUMA

  

  Sode tsurikomi goshi (袖釣込腰): Sleeve lifting and pulling hip throw

A hip technique throw. This throw is not listed in the GOKYO because it is really a variation of  TSURIKOMIGOSHI. It differs from the standard throw in that your right hand holds your opponent’s left outer sleeve or cuff instead of his/her lapel

Favourite Technique of  Toshiko Koga Olympic and World Champion.

                                          Jim Wooley of the United States placed fourth in the OLYMPIC

                                          GAMES (Munich, 1972)

 

             Combination Techniques:      OUCHI GARI

 

             Counter Techniques:              USHIRO GOSHI

                                                                   SUKUI NAGE

                                                                   TANI OTOSHI

 

  Tsuri goshi (釣腰): Lifting hip throw

A hip technique throw. Reach over your UKE’s right shoulder or under his arm with your right hand to grip the side or rear of his belt and pull him forward to break his balance to his front or right front corner then lift him onto your hips and throw him over them. TORI does not have to turn in so deep for this throw as for OGOSHI, nor must be bend his/her knees so much. As for OGOSHI, his/her right hand slips around the back but grips the belt, so as to get a powerful lift. TORI lifts his/her opponent up on to his/her hip rather than just locking his/her opponent to him/her. There are two forms of TSURI-GOSHI, known as KOTSURI-GOSHI (Small hip throw) and OTSURI-GOSHI (Large hip throw).

Favourite technique of Marie-Claire Restoux Olympic Champion and twice World Champion.(left side throw)

 

Combination Techniques:      KOUCHI GARI

                                                       OUCHI GARI

 

Counter Techniques:             USHIRO GOSHI

                                                     TE GURUMA

                                                     UTSURI GOSHI

                                                     OGOSHI

                                                     TANI OTOSHI

                                                     URA NAGE

 

   Tsurikomi goshi (釣込腰): Lifting and pulling hip throw

A hip technique throw. Use your grips on your UKE’s collar and sleeve to break his/her balance to his/her front or right front corner, then drop your hips to the level of his thighs then raise them again while pulling with both hands to throw him over your hips. This throw is very popular with small competitors and is very evident in grading competitions, where there are no weight categories and one is expected to fight all and varying sizes.  This throw is both in the GOKYO and in the NAGE-NO-KATA.

 

Combination Techniques:      KOUCHI GARI

                                                      OUCHI GARI

 

Counter Techniques:             USHIRO GOSHI

                                                     TE GURUMA

                                                     UTSURI GOSHI

                                                     OGOSHI

                                                     TANI OTOSHI

  

Uki goshi (浮腰): Floating half-hip throw

It was developed by Jigoro Kano in the nineteenth century while he was studying Jujitsu in Japan.

A hip technique throw. 4th technique of NAGE NO KATA.  Aftrer breaking your UKE’s balance to his/her right front corner your load him on your hip and throw him/her by twisting your hip to the left. Wrap your arm as far as possible around his/her body. The throw differs from O-GOSHI in that you do not raise your hips or bend forward.It came from the old YOROI KUMI UCHI, by which armor clad warriors grappled in battlefield combat. This technique was one of the favourite techniques (TOKUI WAZA) of the founder of JUDO, Jigoro KANO, who did it left.

 

·         Combination Techniques:           KOUCHI GARI

                                                                             OUCHI GARI

 

·         Counter Techniques:                  USHIRO GOSHI

                                                                             TE GURUMA

                                                                             UTSURI GOSHI

                                                                             OGOSHI

                                                                             TANI OTOSHI

For Reading                                                      

Daigo, Toshirō (2005). Kodokan judo: throwing techniques. Kodansha International. p. 83. ISBN 978-4-7700-2330-8.

 

Ushiro goshi (後腰): Rear throw

Ushiro-goshi is used to counter a hip throw, and is best attempted when UKE has attempted a loin or hip technique.  Putting your arms around your UKE’s from behind your lean backward, swing him/her up in the air, and drip him/her on his/her back. Some competitors lift and bend the left knee, using the left leg to help to lift UKE high into the air. In this way, UKE’s legs are swept up, and he/she is upended completely.

 

   Utsuri goshi (移腰): Hip shift

A hip technique throw. This throw is a GO NO SEN NO WAZA a counter throw. It is used to counter an UKE’s hip technique. The first part is exactly the same as USHIROGOSHI, but on bouncing UKE up into the air with the part of his left hip TORI then swings his left hip across while UKE is in the air and catches him/her on the side of his left hip as UKE descends. At the same time TORI seizes UKI’s body around the waist and then throws UKE with what is now in effect a left OGOSHI..

 

Unrecognized techniques

   Tobi goshi (飛腰): Flying/surfing hip throw

A hip technique throw. This throw was one of Kyuzo MIFUNE’s specialities.

 

   Ushiro Guruma(後車): Rear wheel

 

 

Ashi-waza (足技): foot throwing techniques

A section of the TACHI WAZA (standing techniques) and NAGE WAZA (throwing techniques). ASHIWAZA  throws is an essential part of the repertoire of a good contestant. It is a ’big gun’ if  they do not always work, they are ideal for getting an attack going and  opening up the defence of a difficult opponent.  Here the TORI uses one leg against one of the UKE’s legs to throw him/her. Mainly the legs make contact.

 

For READING

·         Nishioka, Hayward, Foot throws: Karate Judo and self-defence”, Santa Clarita, California,   USA, Ohara Publication, 1972, 95p, ISBN 0897500253.

·         Sato Noboyuki, Ashiwaza (judo masterclass techniques)”, Marlborough, United Kingdom, Crowood, 1990, 111p, ISBN 1852234911.

·         Swain, Michael, Ashiwaza 2: ouchi-gari, kouchi-gari, kosoto-gari, hiza-guruma (judo masterclass techniques)”, London, United Kingdom, Ippon Books, 1994, 111p, ISBN 1874572658.

 

   Ashi guruma (足車): LegIt is one of the original 40 throws of Judo as developed by Jigoro Kano

 A foot technique throw .UKE loses balance in a forward direction to his right front corner you pivot and extend your right leg across his right knee and throw him over your leg in a large circle. This throw resembles HIZA-GURUMA. The entry for this the same as in OGURUMA, but TORI’s working legcatchesUKE’s right leg lower down, just above the ankle on the lower shin.UKE is wheeled over  TORI’s working leg, which can also sweep back to assist the throw.

 

Combination Techniques:          OSOTO GARI

                                                           HARAI GOSHI

                                                           TAI OTOSHI

Counter techniques:                   NIDAN KOSOTO GARI

 

   Deashi harai (出足払): Advanced foot sweep

 

It is one of the original 40 throws of Judo as developed by Jigoro Kano

A foot technique throw. 1st technique of GOKYO. In this technique, you force your opponent to step forward, then sweep his advancing foot out from under him. When your timing is right, the opponent will fall down as if he had slipped. It is a new technique in JUDO it was created by the founder.

 

Combination Techniques:    OUCHI GARI

                                                     TAI OTOSHI

 

                                                     MOROTE SEOINAGE

Counter Techniques:            TSUBAME GAESHI

 

Favourite technique  of    Anton GEESINK

                                                Olympic Gold Medallist (Tokyo, 1964)

                                                World Champion (1961, 1965)

                                                Udo QUELLMALZ

                                                Olympic Gold Medallist (Atlanta, 1996)

 

For Reading

Mifune, Kyuzo: The Canon of Judo, Kodansha International Ltd. (Tokyo) 2004, ISBN 4-7700-2979-9, p.pp. 46–47http://www.judoinfo.com/images/animations/blue/deashibarai.htm

 

   Hane goshi gaeshi (跳腰返): Hip spring counter

A foot technique throw. UKE attacks with right HANE GOSHI. Hook your left leg around his/her lower left leg and reap it to your right.

    

   Harai goshi gaeshi (払腰返): Hip sweep counter

A foot technique throw. It is a simple counter done against an opponent  who has attacked with a HARAI GOSHI but has been stopped in position.

 

   Harai tsurikomi ashi (払釣込足): Lift-pull foot sweep

A foot technique throw. The sweeping, drawing ankle throw in which TORI sweeps UKE’s foot and lifts him/her with the arms to bring about loss of balance directly forward. This throw is like SASAETSURIKOMIASHI but  is better used when UKE is stepping backwards.

Favourite technique of Noboyuki SATO World Champion

                                           (1967, 1973) All Japan Champion (1974)

 

   Hiza guruma (膝車): Knee wheel

A foot technique throw. Break UKE’s balance to his/her right front corner. Place the sole of your foot on the opponent “s knee and throw him-her with your upper body. This throw is very similar to SASAETSURI KOMIASHI, except that TORI wheels his/her opponent round him/herself and catches the outside of UKE’s right knee.

.

  • Combination Technique:   DE-ASHI-BARA

                                                          UCHI MATA

                                                          HANE GOSHI

 

  • Counter Technique:           OUCHI-GARI

                                                               KUCHIKI-DAOSHI

              Favourite Technique  of   Anton Geesink Olympic Champion (1964)

                                                                                           World Champion (1961)

 For Reading

Swain, Mike (1994), "Ashiwaza II", Judo Masterclass Techniques (second ed.) (Ippon Books), ISBN 1-874572-65-8

 http://www.judoinfo.com/video8.htm

 

   Kosoto gake (小外掛): Small outer hook

A foot technique throw. Break UKE’s balance to his/her rear or right rear corner, then hook his/her right ankle from the rear with your left foot and throw him/her backward. This throw is very similar to KOSOTOGARI and could in fact be said to be just a variation. The difference is in the action of the working leg. In this case the working foot goes further around behind UKE’s  lower right leg and hooks round it.

 

Combination Techniques:         KOSOTO GARI

                                                          TAI OTOSHI

Counter Techniques:                  UCHI MATA

 

 

   Kosoto gari (小外刈): Small outer reap

A foot technique throw. Ko-soto gari uses your right foot to clip the outside of  UKE’s left foot when he/She advances forward or retreats backward. It is very effective when UKE has you in a non-standard hold. Frank Wieneke (1962 -) German fighter Olympic (Los Angeles 1984) and European Champion (1986) won his European title with KOSOTO-GARI.

 

Favourite technique of Waldemar Legien (1963-) Twice Olympic Champion (Soul 1988, Barcelona 1992) European Champion (1990)

  • Combination Technique:   OSOTO-GARI

                                                      HARAI-GOSHI

                                                      TAI-OTOSHI

 

  • Counter Technique:            IPPON-SEOI-NAGE

                                                       UCHIMATA

                                                       OUCHI-GARI

STATISTICS: KOSOTO-GARI is the most successful technique in all 797 fights (57/14) /25%/ of the 1999 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP (Men). For Women (311 fights) 21/6 (29 %).

 

   Kouchi gari (小内刈): Small inner reap

A foot technique throw. When UKE moves forward, sideways, or backward, you move in to clip the inside of his/her right foot with your right foot to throw him/her. Kouchi gari can be combined with other techniques (See MOROTE SEOI NAGE, O-UCHI GARI). This throw is best achieved as the end result of a combination movement. The hand action differs from the other throws in that TORI hangs his weight on UKE’s left lapel and right sleeve at the elbow.

  • Combination Technique: SEOI-NAGE

                                                   OUCHI-GARI

 

  • Counter Technique:         HIZA-GURUMA

                                                   KOUCHI-GAESHI

                                                   TOMOE-NAGE

STATISTICS: KOUCHI-GARI is the most successful technique in all 797 fights                (87/28) /32%/ of the 1999 WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP (Men) For Women 311 fights    (44/10) /23%/.

 

   O guruma (大車): Large wheel

A foot technique throw. Get UKE off-balance as you did for HARAI GOSHI, place your right leg across  UKE’s lower abdomen, and throw him/her over it. As the name of the throw suggests it is a very large spinning/wheeling action from start to finish.

 

Combination Techniques:      DEASHI BARAI

                                                       KANI BASAMI

 

Counter Techniques:              USHIRO GOSHI

                                                       UTSURI GOSHI

                                                       TANI OTOSHI

 

   Okuri ashi harai (送足払): Foot sweep

A foot technique throw. TORI breaks UKE”s balance to his/her right side and sweep his/her right foot toward his/her left with TORI’s left foot. The best opportunity is when the opponent is moving sideways. OKURIASHIHARAI is ideal in  a fast –moving contest but really requires split-second timing.

 

  • Combination Technique:       SODE-TSURI

                                                              KOMI-GOSHI

                                                              IPPON-SEOI-NAGE

                                                              TAI-OTOSHI

                                                              HARAI-GOSHI

                                                              SEOI-NAGE

 

  • Counter Technique:               KOUCHI-GARI

                                                             TSUBAME-GAESHI

 

   Osoto gaeshi (大外返): Big outer reap counter

A foot technique throw. TORI moves in for a right OSOTO-GARI. Before he/she has a chance to get UKE off balance to UKE’s right rear, apply TORI’s right OSOTO-GARI.

   Osoto gari (大外刈): Big outer reap

 

A foot technique throw. TORI breaks UKE’s balance toward his/her right back corner, causing him/her to shift all his/her weight toward his/her right heel, and reap his/her right leg with your right leg This throw is very popular among big men and can be used against an opponent of similar height and size. It should not be attempted by a small man on a much bigger opponent.

Old names for this technique include Gyaku-gama, Kaeri-nage and Ke-kaeshi.

 

Favourite Technique of Yasuhiro Yamashita, Olympic and World Champion

                                          Anton GEESINK, Olympic and World Champion

                                          Wilhelm Ruska, Olympic and World Champion

                                          Hitoshi Saito Olympic and World Champion

                                          Ingrid Berghmans, Olympic and World Champion

  • Combination Technique:       HARAI-GOSHI

                                                              OUCHI-GARI

                                                                    OKURI-ASHI-BARAI

                                                                    SASAE-TSURIKOMIASHI

                                                                    KOSOTO-GAKE

 

  • Counter Technique:               OSOTO-SUKASHI

                                                             OSOTO-GARI

                                                             USHIRO-GOSHI

 

STATISTICS: OUCHI-GARI is the most successful technique in all 797 fights (106/32)

/30%/ of the WORLD CHAMPIONSHIP, 1999 (Men). For women (31/17) /55%/

 

For READING

·         Hoare, Sydney R., Goodger, J.M., Famous Judo throws: 2 Osotogari”, London,      United Kingdom, Leonard Hill Books, 1968, 110p,  ISBN 034024786X.

·         Lubbert, Hal, Insights on judo: The tactics of Osotogari”, Cedar Falls, Iowa, USA,     Kodokan Iowa Pub, 1986, LoC.

·         Yamashita Yasuhiro, “Osoto-gari (judo masterclass techniques)”, Wiltshire, United Kingdom, Crowood, 1991, 96p, ISBN 1852234903.

  

Osoto guruma (大外車): Big outer wheel

A foot technique throws. Break your UKE’s balance to his/her rear or fight rear corner, then pivot left to extend your right leg diagonally across the back of his/her right knee and use your right thigh as a fulcrum over which to throw him/her. It is much the same as OSOTOGARI, the difference being that TORI sweeps away both legs rather than the nearest one. The fall from this throw is very heavy indeed.

 

   Osoto otoshi (大外落): Big outer drop

A foot technique throw. This technique is similar to OSOTO-GARI in that you step behind UKE and throw him/her backward.Instead of reaping UKE`s leg, however, raise your right leg high then bring it down from outside, behind, and above UKE`s right leg, that it descends against his/her thigh as a brace that breaks his/her balance and causes  him/her to fall.

 

   Ouchi gaeshi (大内返): Big inner reap counter

A foot technique throw. Ouchi gaeshi is the name given to the technique used to counter the UKE’s ouchi gari

A foot technique throw. When UKE  attempts a right OUCHI GARI (large inner reap) before he/she has a chance to apply the technique fully, use your left leg to sweep his/her hooking right leg out from under him/her instead and throw him/her onto his/her back

 

   Ouchi gari (大内刈): Big inner reap

A foot technique throws. After breaking UKE’s balance to his/her left back corner, reap his/her left leg from the inside with your right leg so *** he falls backward. It is a ‘light throw’ not a ‘big – powerful – gun’. This and throws like it are an essential part of the repertoire of a good contestant. Even if they normally work but not always, they are ideal for getting an attack going and opening up the defence of a difficult opponent.

Favourite technique of  

Katsuhiko Kashiwazaki twice World Champion

Peter Seisenbacher (1960 -) twice Olympic Champion (1984, 1988)

World Champion(1985)

 

Yasuhiro Yamashita (1957-) Olympic Gold Medallist ( Los Angeles, 1984)

 World Champion (1979, 1981, 1983)

 All-Japan Champion (1977-1985) nine times

Paul MARUYAMA United States Champion and Olympian

Irwin Cohen Unites States Grand Champion and Olympian

 

  • Combination Technique:       KOUCHI-GARI

                                                              UCHI-MATA

                                                              OSOTO-GARI

                                                             TAI-OTOSHI

 

  • Counter Technique:              OUCHI-GAESHI

                                                            TOMOE-NAGE

                                                                  IPPON-SEOI-NAGE

 

For READING

·         Legett, Trevor P.: Watanabe, Kisaburo, Championship Judo attacks: tai otoshi and o-uchi-gari”, London, United Kingdom, Ippon, 1994, 64p ISBN 0874572550.

  

Sasae tsurikomi ashi (支釣込足): Propping and drawing ankle throw

A foot technique throws. After breaking UKE’s balance to his/her left back corner, reap his/her left leg from the inside with your right leg so *** he falls backward. It is a ‘light throw’ not a ‘big – powerful – gun’. This and throws like it are an essential part of the repertoire of a good contestant. Even if they normally work but not always, they are ideal for getting an attack going and opening up the defence of a difficult opponent.

Favourite technique of  

Katsuhiko Kashiwazaki twice World Champion

Peter Seisenbacher (1960 -) twice Olympic Champion (1984, 1988)

World Champion(1985)

 

Yasuhiro Yamashita (1957-) Olympic Gold Medallist ( Los Angeles, 1984)

 World Champion (1979, 1981, 1983)

 All-Japan Champion (1977-1985) nine times

Paul MARUYAMA United States Champion and Olympian

Irwin Cohen Unites States Grand Champion and Olympian

 

  • Combination Technique:       KOUCHI-GARI

                                                             UCHI-MATA

                                                             OSOTO-GARI

                                                             TAI-OTOSHI

 

  • Counter Technique:               OUCHI-GAESHI

                                                             TOMOE-NAGE

                                                                   IPPON-SEOI-NAGE

 

For READING

·         Legett, Trevor P.: Watanabe, Kisaburo, Championship Judo attacks: tai otoshi and o-uchi-gari”, London, United Kingdom, Ippon, 1994, 64p ISBN 0874572550.

  

Tsubame gaeshi (燕返): Swallow counter

A counter throwing technique of the leg or foot category. No classified in the GO KYO NO WAZA.When UKE attemps to sweep away an ankle as in DE-ASHI-BARAI TORI  lifts his/her ankle out of the way and applies the same ankle sweep back on UKE.

   Uchi mata (内股): Inner-thigh

A foot technique throw. 9th technique of NAGE NO KATA. It is one of the few throws in this group in which  UKE is thrown to his/her front and not backwards. The success of this move depends on placing your thigh as far in as possible between the UKE’s thighs and lifting him off the ground, throwing him down with the power of your hands, hip, and thigh if the UKE stands in the natural position, he will be difficult to throw, his/her legs, therefore, should be made to spread apart, or his weight should be made to rest on one leg. There are two main styles of this throw: Ouchimata, the deep turn, and Kouchimata, the straight leg sweep. In Ouchimata, contact is made by TORI with the back of his/her thigh, in Kouchimata with the outside of the thigh. To get a strong sweep in Kouchimata, the working leg should be kept as straight as possible, with the toes pointed. It is a perfect throw for a small man to attempt this throw on a bigger opponent – but then there is always the odd exception, one of the delightful surprises in JUDO competition.

 

STATISTICS  uchimata is the most successful technique in all 797 fights (69 %) of the

                         World Championships. 1999 (Men)

                     

Favourite Technique of Anton GEESINK Olympic Champion twice World Champion

Neil Adams World and European Champion

Yasuhiro Yamashita Olympic and twice World Champion

Sumio Endo twice World Champion

James BREGMAN Olympic Bronze Medalist

Pat Burris, Olympian, Unites States Lightweight Champion

 

Combination techniques:       OUCHIGARI

                                                      KOUCHIGARI

 

 

Counter techniques               SUKUI NAGE

                                                     UCHIMATA-SUKASHI

                                                     TAI-OTOSHI

                                                     TANI-OTOSHI

 

 

For READING

·         Sugai Hitoshi, “Uchimata (judo masterclass techniques)”, London, United Kingdom, Ippon Books, 1991, 112p, ISBN 0951845519.

  

Uchi mata gaeshi (内股返): Inner-thigh counter

A foot technique throw. When your UKE moves in for an UCHI MATA, hook your left leg around his/her left leg and reap it to your right.

 

Sutemi-waza (捨身技): sacrifice techniques

General term for throws in which the TORI sacrifices him/her self by falling to the rear or side as part of process of the throw. (See also MA SUTEMI WAZA, YOKO SUTEMI WAZA and IJF CONTEST RULES Article 9).

 

Ma-sutemi (真捨身技): rear sacrifices

Masutemi waza are often used to bring the UKE to the TATAMI and apply KATAME-WAZA (grappling techniques), which, if unbroken or painful enough, can earn the TORI a victory. Techniques of Ma Sutemi Waza.

 

   Hikikomi gaeshi (引込返): Pulling in reversal

A cacrifice . Grab UKE”s belt from over his-her shoulder and fall sideways to make the throw. This is a technique which is often used to enter KATAMEWAZA.

Combination Technique:  KOUCHI-GARI

                                                      OUCHI-GARI

                                                      HARAI-GOSHI

                                                      KOSOTO-GARI

                                                      SUKUI-NAGE

Favorite Technique of Katsuhiko KASHIWAZAKI (1951 -) World Champion (1981) All-Japan Weight Category Champion (1975, 1978, 1979, 1980, 1981) World Sambo Champion (1975)

 

   Sumi gaeshi (隅返): Corner reversal

A sacrifice technique. Break your opponent’s balance to his front or right front corner, then fall backwards, as your do catching the instep of your right foot under and behind his left knee or thigh to lift him up and throw him over your head.

 

Combination Techniques:      DEASHI BARAI

Counter Techniques:               OUCHI GARI

 

   Tawara gaeshi (俵返): Rice bag reversal throw

This throw is much like lifting a bale of straw. When the UKE reaches low around your legs or waist move back so that his head drops down by your lower abdomen. Hen reach around his waist, pulling him in toward you. Spread your legs and drop down on your back, buttocks first. In doing so snap your abdomen forward and lift with your arms, throwing him over either of your shoulders.

 

   Tomoe nage (巴投): Circle throw

 A sacrifice. This throw, the whirl throw, is classified as a back sacrifice technique (MASUTEMI WAZA).

TORI lets him/her self fall backwards to the ground (Masutemi), with one leg bent up and placed in UKE’s groin TORI pulls UKE forward as he/she falls backwards, and with the aid of the raised leg and hands sends UKE up and over to fall beyond TORI’s head. Also known as KE-AGE and KE-GAESHI. Shozo Fujii (1950 -) four times World Champion took an unprecedenten third world title (Vienna, 1975) defeating another Japanese fighter, Yoshimi Hara, in the final with TOMOENAGE. Karen Briggs (1963-) British fighter four times World  (1982, 1984, 1986, 1989) and five  times European Champion (1982, 83, 84, 86, 87) was best known for a very fast YOKO-TOMOE-NAGE. Sumikichi Nozaki, five-times Unites States Champion employed this technique with frequent success.

 

  • Combination Technique:        UDEHISIGI-JUJIGATAME

 

  • Counter Technique:                OUCHI-GARI

                                                                    KUCHIKI-DAOSHI

 

 

For READING

·         Kashiwazaki Katsuhiko, Tomoe-nage (judo masterclass techniques)”, Marlborough, United Kingdom, Crowood, 1989, 96p, ISBN 1852232498.

  

Ura nage (裏投): Rear throw

A sacrifice. 11th technique of NAGE NO KATA. This throw, the rear throw is classified as back sacrifice technique (MASUTEMI WAZA)This is used either as a counter-technique or as a direct throw.

You put both arms around your UKE from his/her right side (or from behind ) lift him/her up and throw him/her back over your left shoulder as you sacrifice yourself by falling backward This throw is like YOKOGURUMA, in that TORI uses it  as a counter-technique. The fall from this throw is very heavy and should never be attempted on the inexperienced. This is a technique that has been used with great effect in first class competition by Russian judo fighters.

 

Yoko-sutemi (橫捨身技): side sacrifices

In these techniques TORI sacrifices him/her self by falling to the right or left in the process of throwing the UKE.

 

   Hane makikomi (跳巻込): Springing wraparound

   Harai makikomi (払巻込): Hip sweep wraparound

   Kani basami (蟹挟): Crab or scissors throw. (Forbidden in competition.)

   Kawazu gake (河津掛): One-leg entanglement. (Forbidden in competition.)

   Osoto makikomi (大外巻込): Big outer wraparound

   Soto makikomi (外巻込): Outer wraparound

   Tani otoshi (谷落): Valley drop

   Uchi makikomi (内巻込): Inner wraparound

   Uchi mata makikomi (内股巻込): Inner thigh wraparound

   Uki waza (浮技): Floating drop

   Yoko gake (横掛): Side prop

   Yoko guruma (横車): Side wheel

   Yoko otoshi (横落): Side drop

   Yoko wakare (横分): Side separation

 

Unrecognized techniques

 

   Tama guruma (彈車):Jade wheel

   Ude gaeshi (腕返): Arm reversal

   Yoko Tomoe Nage (横巴投): Side circle throw

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2 Katame-waza: grappling techniques

Katame-waza comprise OSAE-KOMI-WAZA (hold-down techniques), SHIME-WAZA (strangling techniques) and KANSETSU-WAZA (joint techniques. The term NE-WAZA (mat work) is sometimes used in place of KATAME-WAZA.

 

For READING

·         Harrison, Ernest John: Oda Tsunetani,” Judo on the groung: Katamewaza – the Oda method”, London, United kingdom, W. Foulsham and Co., 1954, 199p

·         Kudo Kazuzo, Dynamic Judo: Grappling techniques”, Tokyo, Japan, Japan Publication Trading, 1967, 1970, 224p

·         Okano Isao, “Vital judo: Grappling techniques”, Tokyo, Japan, Japan Publication, 1976, 1982, 191p, ISBN 0870405179.

 

Osaekomi-waza (押込技): pins or matholds

Mat techniques used to pin a supine UKE to the mat (TATAMI), usually from the side or diagonally, to inhibit his/her freedom of movement and prevent him/her from rising . In the faudal Japan it was known as osae-waza or TORAE, which called be used effectively to paralyze an opponent, whether standing or lying down, and reduce his capacity to operate in combat without causing him to lose consciousness. These techniques were particularly useful in combat when an opponent had to be taken alive and were, therefore, favored by police forces in the towns and castle precincts of faudal Japan. Techniques of OSAEKOMIWAZA:KESA GATAME,KUZURE KESA GATAME USHIRO KESA GATAME,MAKURA KESA GATAME,KATA GATAME,KAMI SHIHO GATAME,KUZURE KAMI SHIHO GATAME,YOKO SHIHO GATAME,KUZURE YOKO SHIHO GATAME,TATE SHIHO GATAME, (See IJF CONTEST RULES, Article 26, and 20/b-c, 24/b, 25/b)

 

NEW RULES

Changes have been made to bring holddown times into line with the IJF and Japanese organisations.

 

Less than 15 seconds no score.

15 seconds or more but less than 20 seconds - yuko

20 seconds or more but less than 25 seconds - waza-ari

25 seconds – ippon.

 

The justification for this area is purely from a compatibility point of view with the IJF and other associations. It seems the only other organisation with 30 seconds holddown duration for Ippon is the Kodokan, who are also in the process of changing to 25 seconds.

 

   Kami-shiho-gatame (上四方固): Upper four quarter hold down

   Kata-gatame (肩固): Shoulder hold

   Kesa-gatame (袈裟固): Scarf hold

   Kuzure-kami-shiho-gatame (崩上四方固): Broken upper four quarter hold down

   Kuzure-kesa-gatame (崩袈裟固): Broken scarf hold

   Tate-shiho-gatame (縦四方固): Vertical four quarter hold

   Yoko-shiho-gatame (横四方固): Side four quarter hold

 

 

 

Unrecognized techniques

 

   Uki-gatame (浮固): Floating hold

   Ura-gatame (裹固)

   Ura-kesa-gatame (裹袈裟固)

   Ushiro-kesa-gatame (後袈裟固): Reverse Scarf Hold. The Kodokan officially also refers to this        technique as kuzure-kesa-gatame.[1]

   Sangaku-Gatame : Triangular Hold (三角固)

 

Shime-waza (絞技): chokes or strangles

 

 

   Do-jime (胴絞): Trunk strangle. Do-jime is a prohibited technique in Judo[1], and is considered a    'slight infringement' according to IJF rules, Section 27: Prohibited acts and penalties, article

   Gyaku Jūji-jime (逆十字絞): Reverse cross strangle

   Hadaka-jime (裸絞): Naked strangle

   Kata-ha-jime (片羽絞): Single wing strangle

   Kata-juji-jime (片十字絞): Half cross strangle

   Kata-te-jime (片手絞): One-hand strangle

   Nami-juji-jime (並十字絞): Normal cross strangle

   Okuri-eri-jime (送襟絞): Sliding lapel strangle

   Ryo-te-jime (両手絞): Two-hand strangle

   Sankaku-jime (三角絞): Triangular strangle, triangle choke

   Sode-guruma-jime (袖車絞): Sleeve wheel strangle (Eziquiel/Ezekiel choke)

   Tsukkomi-jime (突込絞): Thrust choke

 

 

 

Unrecognized techniques

   Jigoku-jime (地獄絞): Hell strangle[3]

   Ura-juji-jime (裹十字絞)

 

Kansetsu-waza (関節技): joint locks

   Ashi-garami (足緘): Leg entanglement. (Forbidden in competition.)

   Ude-garami (腕緘): Arm entanglement or "figure-four" key lock

   Ude-hishigi-ashi-gatame (腕挫足固): Side-lying arm bar

   Ude-hishigi-hara-gatame (腕挫腹固): Side-extended arm bar, lower stomach against opponent's elbow.

   Ude-hishigi-hiza-gatame (腕挫膝固): Knee arm bar.

   Ude-hishigi-juji-gatame (腕挫十字固): Back-lying perpendicular arm bar.

   Ude-hishigi-sankaku-gatame (腕挫三角固): Triangular strangle, using the legs.

   Ude-hishigi-te-gatame (腕挫手固):

   Ude-hishigi-ude-gatame (腕挫腕固):

   Ude-hishigi-waki-gatame (腕挫腋固):

 

Unrecognized techniques

   Ashi-hishigi (足挫)

   Sankaku-garami (三角緘): Triangular entanglement

Atemi-waza (当て身技): body-striking techniques

 

Although taught within kata ( or ) and sometimes used within informal randori (乱取), striking techniques are forbidden in standard judo competitions rules.


Keri-waza

    Mae-ate: Front knee

    Mae-geri: Front kick

    Naname-geri: Roundhouse Kick

    Taka-geri: High front kick

    Ushiro-geri: Backward kick

    Yoko-geri: Side kick

 

Ude-Ate-waza: arm striking techniques

 

    Empi-uchi: Elbow blow

    Kami-ate: Upward blow

    Kirioroshi: Downward knife hand blow

    Naname-ate: Front crossing blow

    Naname-uchi: Slanting knife hand blow

    Ryogan-tsuki: throat strike - Strike both eyes with fingertips

    Shimo-tsuki: Downward blow

    Tsukiage: Uppercut

    Tsukidashi: Stomach punch with fingertips

    Tsukkake: Straight punch

    Uchioroshi: Downward strike

    Ushiro-ate: Rear elbow strike

    Ushiro-sumi-tsuki: Rear corner blow

    Ushiro-tsuki: Rear blow