A History of the Kodokan - University of Montana Judo website.

Two months of training at the Kodokan - Description of life in the Kodokan Hostel.

Eisho-ji Tempel first dojo of Kano (1882)

Kodokan Today

Today, the Kodokan has 1,206 mats across the five main dojo (training halls)—Main, School, International, Women's, and Boys'—plus a special dojo for retired judoka and special technique study purposes.

"The world is changing and Ju Jutsu has to change too. I don’t think it’s practical to limit ourselves to one particular style. I no longer see any point in keeping the techniques of each Ju Jutsu school a secret. It would be better to experiment with a whole range of techniques and select the ones you want to use, changing them if necessary. I’d like to take the best techniques from the Yoshin style and the best techniques from a lot of other styles and combine them all to create the ultimate form of Ju Jutsu. Last year after we performed for President Grant, Master Fukuda spoke of bringing Ju Jutsu to the rest of the world. To do that, we can’t rely on just one particular style – we need a combination of the best techniques from all the major schools of Ju Jutsu. That’s what I’d like to teach to the rest of the world." — Jigoro Kano, 1880

KODOKAN  (講道館 („Institute for study of the way”)

 

 

JUDO training hall, Tokyo the Mecca of JUDO in Japan. The first KODOKAN was opened by KANO at Shitaya in 1882 and consisted of only 12 mats. At present housed in an eight storey building, at 16-31, I-Chome, Kasuga-cho, Bukyo-ku, Tokyo, it has facilities for eating sleeping as well as large training areas. The KODOKAN has kept a watchful eye on the development of the sport; most of the leading 1st DAN may have their grades registered there. The cream of Japan’s JUDOKA plus a number of selected foreigners make up kenshusei.

 

The Institute was founded with only nine disciples (Shiro Saigo, Yamashita Yoshiaki,

Yokoyama Sakujiro, and Tsunejiro Tomita.)

 

KODOKAN Institutes (1882 - till today)

 

  • 12 mats (May 1882 Eishoji Temple)
  • 10 mats (Feb. 1883 Jimocho, Kanda)
  • 20 mats (Sept. 1883 Shihan's house, Kojimachi)
  • 40 mats (Spring 1887 Mr. Shinagawa's house, Kojimachi)
  • 60 mats (April 1890 Hongo-ku, Masaga-cho)
  • 107 mats (Feb. 1894 Koishikawa-cho, Shimotomisaka-cho)
  • 207 mats (Nov. 1897 Koishikawa, Shimotomisaka-cho)
  • 314 mats (Jan. 1898 Otsuka Sakashita-cho)
  • 514 mats (Dec. 1919 1-chome Kasuga-cho, Bunkyo-ku)
  • 986 mats (March 1958 2-chome, Kasuga-cho, Bunko-ku)

 

Today, the Kodokan has 1,206 mats across the five main dojo (training halls)—Main, School, International, Women's, and Boys'—plus a special dojo for retired judoka and special technique study purposes.

 

Presidents of KODOKAN

 

1st KANO Jigoro 1882-1938

2nd Nango Jiro 1938-1946

3rd Kano Risei 1946 -1980

4th Kano Yukimitsu (1932-)  1980-2009

5th Uemura Haruki 2009 – till Present

 

For READING

·         Kano Jigoro,” Kodokan Judo”, Kodansha International, 1986, 264p, ISBN-13: 9784770017994

·         Masumoto David, An introduction to Kodokan Judo: History and philosophy”, Tokyo, Japan, Hon-No-Tomosha, 1996, 316p, ISBN 4894390426.

·         http://www.kodokan.org

 

 

Statue of Jigorō Kanō outside The Kodokan Institute