European Judo Championships

 

EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIPS (for men) by T. Plavecz

 

The first official European Championship took place in 1951 in Paris. KODOKAN President Risei KANO ( 1900-1986) ) led a large Japanese delegation that included All Japan JUDO Champion Toshiro DAIGO. JUDO men from France, Holland, Belgium, Switzerland, Britain, Italy, Germany, and Austria fought in front of 13,000 spectators for team and individual titles. It had no weights but the competitors were segregated according to grade- brown belt, 1st DAN, 2nd DAN, and 3rd DAN, and plus Open category. (See WEIGHT CATEGORIES) France, Great Britain, and Holland dominated the first five European Championships. For Britain such men as PALMER, Young, Mack, and GLEESON were the leading fighters. Holland produced the great Anton GEESINK for the championships in 1951 .He made the finest competition career of any non-Japanese JUDO fighter.

 

 

EUROPEAN CHAMPIONSHIPS (For Women)

The first official European Championship took place in Munich (1975). It was a completely separate venue and date from the men. This went on from 1975 until 1987 in Paris when the Men’s and Women’s European championships were combined. Chris Child, fighting int he over 72 kg weight group, was the only British player to win a gold medal. Kathy Nichol (under 61 kg),

Geraldine Harmon (under 72 kg), Ellen Cobb and Margaret McKenna won bronze medals.

Most successful European female judoka

Most successful European male judoka

European Judo Championships

1 dan

 

1. PARISET Bernard 1929-2004) FRA

    He was a French judoka and jujitsuka who studied with many Japanese masters including Jigoro Kano's student, Mikonosuke Kawaishi  and his assistant, Shozo Awazu. 

2. SCHOMBERT Horst (GER)

 

3. RAVINET Georges (BEL)

 

3. JACQUEMOND Robert (AUT)

 

2 dan

 

1. CAUQUIL Guy (FRA)

 

2. CHAPLAIN (GBR)

 

3. KONING Dik (NED)

 

3. TOBLER Robert (TCH)

 

3 dan

 

1. DE HERDT Jean (1923-2013) FRA

    He was the first European judo champion, a 4-time European champion (1951, open -3. dan, 1952 4.dan, 1955 4. dan)  actually. He is considered as one of Kawaishi's first judo student and started judo the same year as Fukuda Keiko (1935). As so many, he became the victim of judo politics.

2. GLEESON Geof (GBR)

 

kyu

 

1. DUPRE Michel (FRA)

 

2. GEESINK Anton (NED)

 

3. UNTERBURGER Richard (GER)

 

3. VOLPI Elio (ITA)

 

open

 

1. DE HERDT Jean (FRA)

 

2. GLEESON Geof (GBR)

 

3. RAVINET Georges (BEL)

 

3. JACQUEMOND Robert (AUT)

 

 

津 正蔵 AWAZU SHOZO, (1923 – 2016) was a Japanese master of judo who achieved the rank of Kōdōkan 9th Dan. He led the development of judo in France.

He was the teacher of Henri Courtine and Bernard Pariset. From 1953 to 2014, he was professor of judo at the Racing Club de France in Paris.

Awazu was a top expert in ne waza (grappling techniques), kata and tandoku-renshu.

 

 

 

KAWAISHI MIKONOSUKE 川石 酒造之助

 

(1899-1969) Non-Kodokan 10th Dan (FFDJA 10th Dan)

Japanese-born French JUDO pioneer. He studied JU-JUTSU in Kyoto. It is not known exactly what style of JU-JUTSU he learnt. In England he continues to teach this form refer to his teaching as Kawaishi Ryu JU-JUTSU. In the mid 1920’s he left Japan and toured the United States. In 1928, he arrived in the United Kingdom and established a JU-JUTSU club in Liverpool. In 1931, he moved to London, founding the Anglo-Japanese JUDO Club and teaching JUDO at Oxford University. Around this time he was awarded his third DAN by JIgoro KANO. It was common at this time for JU-JUTSU instructors to teach, or call what they taught, JUDO. In 1936, then a fourth DAN, Kawaishi moved to Paris where he taught JU-JUTSU and JUDO. During World War II, he returned to Japan. After the war he returned to Paris to continue teaching. He introduced various coloured belts in Europe. He developed an intuitive style of instruction and a numerical ordering of the techniques that he felt was more suitable for the occidental. This seemed to catch on in France and there was a rapid growth of interest in JUDO. He placed special emphasis on KATA training. He promulgated KYUZO MIFUNE’s Gonosen No KATA (The KATA of Counters) in Europe and possibly his own version of Go No KATA. He also wrote the book “Seven KATAs of JUDO”.